The Tusoan

Things you will find here: science, science advocacy, musings on space exploration and technology, anthropological thoughts, maps, charts, descriptions of the evolutionary process, images of stuff, Native American cultural introspection and an open mind.

And hopefully insect portraits. Lot of those soon.
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Today is my birthday and I am giving all of YOU a gift. This is a short video of giant bubbles in slow motion. Its mesmerizing!

Enjoy =)

http://vimeo.com/user6278285/bubbles

faultinourstarsmovie:

One note = one vote. Like or reblog to vote for your state! Go Alabama! http://thefaultinourstarsmovie.com/demandourstars 

faultinourstarsmovie:

One note = one vote. Like or reblog to vote for your state! Go Alabama! http://thefaultinourstarsmovie.com/demandourstars 

World map of human migrations, with the North Pole at center. Africa, harboring the start of the migration, is at the top left and South America at the far right. Migration patterns are based on studies of mitochondrial DNA. 

 - Dashed lines are hypothetical migrations.

 - Numbers represent thousand years before present.

 - The blue line represents area covered in ice or tundra during the last great ice age.

The letters are the mitochondrial DNA haplogroups (pure motherly lineages); Haplogroups can be used to define genetic populations and are often geographically oriented. For example, the following are common divisions for mtDNA haplogroups:

 - African: L, L1, L2, L3

 - Near Eastern: J, N

 - Southern European: J, K

 - General European: H, V

 - Northern European: T, U, X

 - Asian: A, B, C, D, E, F, G (note: M is composed of C, D, E, and G)

 - Native American: A, B, C, D, and sometimes X

This map and its info are in full service over at Wikipedia and parts beyond and were lifted shamelessly, by me, to show to you. It originates from http://www.mitomap.org/

Most Americans have forgotten about Russia. I mean, we certainly worried about them during the Cold War, but after the Berlin Wall came down, and Russia set about trying to establish pro-western economic reforms, the American public drifted on to other topics and considerations (namely, the so-called War on Terror).

Ukraine and the current Crimea crisis has brought Russia back into the mainstream conversation again. And it is troubling how much we weren’t paying attention to things concerning our current frenemy. Things like just how different Russia still is from us culturally and politically. And just how wildly homophobic, racist and xenophobic mainstream Russian society can be towards outsiders.

Most troubling is that some Russians crave another Cold War and still consider the United States to be public enemy number one - and have been preaching about it for years. According to the New York Times, that anti-American attitude is currently in a surprising upswing in Russia.

You can read about it in this article over at The New York Times: http://nyti.ms/1cO4kMg

What else I find troubling is that some Americans in the United States have been showing respect toward Russia for its recent actions in Ukraine. Namely, conservative talking heads (which, I know, do not represent much in the way of the American public). The conservative wish for strong, centralized leadership - something they would quickly deny and never consciously acknowledge - is apparent in much of their talking points criticism against “liberal” interests and President Obama. I’ve long suspected that the Right would prefer giving the executive branch more authority.

Check out this Daily Show clip for a quick glance at that favorable praise conservative talking heads have been handing out: http://bit.ly/1grDfJN

Maybe some of these talking heads might prefer a life in Russia? Maybe, their current attitudes toward Russia’s “ability to lead” would evaporate in the face of more obvious Russian antagonism towards the United States? I don’t know. Maybe they don’t either.

I do know that Russia and the United States have completely different values and that “strong, centralized leadership” is something Russians might instinctively prefer. And I would hope Russia would want to avoid any kind of direct conflict, cold or otherwise, with the United States the same as I would.

I do know that Russia and the United States have completely different values. 

image

Meanwhile, in the Magic City, someone decided it was a good idea to be an intolerant tool and hang a bunch of provocative racist signs around town.

Original Story: http://blog.al.com/spotnews/2014/03/birmingham_police_remove_banne.html

While I am not surprised about the signs - I do live in Alabama (these sort of things do pop up) - I am, however, rather shocked at the frothy racist cocktail foaming up in the comments section at the horrifically designed and disastrously implementedal.com. For example, a slice of wisdom from commentator shuai ge:

"Not only that, it is blindingly obvious that not every race is capable of building/maintaining a 1st world nation. You can‘t build 1st world nations with lower IQ, crime-prone races. You can’t create wealth with races that have never created advanced nations themselves. The truth is “racist”."

I know most Americans aren’t like this. Nevertheless, when I see this uninformed, delusional attitude in action, I weep for my country.

To those who hold to such nonsensical, arbitrary categories of human division, I say only this: I wish we were better strangers.

The two halves of the United States economy, via redditor atrubeskoy. 

Happy Darwin Day, ya’ll =)

Within a 10-20 year span in the middle of the 17th century, as far as I can deduce, England was introduced to Tea from China, Coffee from Arabs and Chocolate by way of Mexico. They, naturally, sold all three out of the same establishment, the coffeehouse.

Can you imagine all three of these things landing in your culture at virtually the same time? Madness…

Sometimes justice takes a generation or two. 

EXACTLY. This…

"What about retirement security? Again, this generation has seen the retirement hopes of its parents fade with lackluster investment results and crumbling pensions. It seems the Great Recession left its mark. As a group, Millennials prize job mobility, flexible schedules, any work that is more interesting than punching a keyboard, and the ability to travel and be with friends. Millennials (11%) are far more likely than boomers (3%) to identify close friends as part of their family. To an extent, they are starting to get what they want at the office."